Skip to main content
main-content
Top

26-05-2016 | Uterine cancer | Article

Long term follow-up of a phase II trial of multimodal therapy given in a “sandwich” method for stage III, IV, and recurrent endometrial cancer

Journal:
Gynecologic Oncology Research and Practice

Authors: Michelle Glasgow, Rachel Isaksson Vogel, Jennifer Burgart, Peter Argenta, Kathryn Dusenbery, Melissa A. Geller

Publisher: BioMed Central

Abstract

Background

Our objective was to determine if previously reported overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates are maintained long term following multimodal therapy for advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer and to assess the lymphedema rates associated with this therapy.

Methods

Women with advanced-stage or recurrent endometrial cancer were recruited between 9/2004 and 6/2009 to our previously published Phase II trial. Patients received intravenous docetaxel (75 mg/m2) and carboplatin (AUC = 6) every 3 weeks for 3 cycles before and after radiation therapy. Patient outcomes were updated in July 2014. Data abstracted included presence of lymphedema, disease progression, and death. OS and PFS estimates at 5 years were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods.

Results

Of the 41 patients enrolled, 10 (24 %) had stage IIIA and 21 (51 %) had stage IIIC disease; 32 (78 %) had endometrioid histology; and 35 (85 %) completed the protocol. With a median follow-up of 5 years, 15 of 41 patients have died. The Kaplan–Meier estimate and 95 % CI for OS at 5 years was 70 % (53–82 %). Excluding the two patients with recurrent disease at enrollment, 15 of 39 patients progressed or died during follow-up. The Kaplan–Meier estimate and 95 % CI for PFS at 5 years was 66 % (48–78 %). Fifteen patients (37 %) had medical record documentation of lymphedema following treatment.

Conclusions

After additional follow-up, OS and PFS estimates remain high and in-field recurrences low following “sandwich” therapy. The “sandwich” method remains efficacious for women with stage III-IV or recurrent endometrial cancer.

Please log in to get access to this content

Related topics